9 June 2024

To: Austrade

 

To whom it may concern:

Ref: Thrive 2030 Strategy – Youth Tourism

We write to you on behalf of the Backpacker and Youth Tourism Advisory Panel (BYTAP) in relation to the Thrive 2030 strategy.

BYTAP is the peak industry body for the vital youth tourism sector of the visitor economy, and is supported by, and has representation on the Panel, from the three formal, incorporated state-based youth tourism associations in Australia, being Adventure Queensland (AQ), Youth Tourism Victoria (YTV), and Youth Tourism NSW (YTNSW). We also consult regularly with youth tourism operators across Australia in other States. Additionally, we are regularly in contact with ATEC and TTF.

Our Association particularly advocates for the Working Holiday Maker program, that is worth $3.2Bn annually to the Australian economy (source: Tourism Australia, Working Holiday Maker Snapshot, 2021 –

www.tourism.australia.com/content/dam/digital/corporate/documents/ta-whm-infographic-october-2021.pdf)

BYTAP supports continuation and expansion of this critical reciprocal cultural exchange program, under the current policy settings, that currently encompasses 48 countries.

In particular, we draw your attention to the most recent report on the program to December 2023:

https://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/research-and-statistics/statistics/visa-statistics/visit

Additionally, a Austrade/Flinders University report on Perceptions of the Working Holiday Maker program (published 2022) contains essential information on this essential market segment – see https://bytap.org/perceptions-of-australias-working-holiday-maker-program/

Our Association notes and supports Action Item 3.4 (extract below) in the Thrive 2030 strategy, action and implementation plan:

In addition to this, we draw your attention to the following initiatives that would enhance the Working Holiday Maker program:

Removing some of the additional WHM visa subclass 462 requirements

Work and Holiday (sub-class 462) visa applicants must meet additional requirements to those on the 417 subclass (Working Holiday) visa, varying between eligible countries and based on the agreements set out in the MOU for partner countries. These can include requiring tertiary level education, English language testing and letters of support from foreign governments. These requirements are not evenly applied to all countries in the program (and are not requirements under the subclass 417 visa). For example, applicants from Spain need to undergo English Language testing, which is not applicable for applicants from their neighbouring country, France. These additional requirements act as a barrier to applying and generate negative word of mouth for the scheme, so we request that they are reviewed and where possible removed to level the playing field between countries.

Our Association would be pleased to have a representative elaborate on the issues, should you wish to contact us click here.

Yours sincerely,

WENDI AYLWARD, CHAIRPERSON 

 

THRIVE 2030 strategy is a long-term plan for growing Australia’s visitor economy. Click here to read more.

LATEST POSTS

9 June 2024

To: Austrade

 

To whom it may concern:

Ref: Thrive 2030 Strategy – Youth Tourism

We write to you on behalf of the Backpacker and Youth Tourism Advisory Panel (BYTAP) in relation to the Thrive 2030 strategy.

BYTAP is the peak industry body for the vital youth tourism sector of the visitor economy, and is supported by, and has representation on the Panel, from the three formal, incorporated state-based youth tourism associations in Australia, being Adventure Queensland (AQ), Youth Tourism Victoria (YTV), and Youth Tourism NSW (YTNSW). We also consult regularly with youth tourism operators across Australia in other States. Additionally, we are regularly in contact with ATEC and TTF.

Our Association particularly advocates for the Working Holiday Maker program, that is worth $3.2Bn annually to the Australian economy (source: Tourism Australia, Working Holiday Maker Snapshot, 2021 –

www.tourism.australia.com/content/dam/digital/corporate/documents/ta-whm-infographic-october-2021.pdf)

BYTAP supports continuation and expansion of this critical reciprocal cultural exchange program, under the current policy settings, that currently encompasses 48 countries.

In particular, we draw your attention to the most recent report on the program to December 2023:

https://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/research-and-statistics/statistics/visa-statistics/visit

Additionally, a Austrade/Flinders University report on Perceptions of the Working Holiday Maker program (published 2022) contains essential information on this essential market segment – see https://bytap.org/perceptions-of-australias-working-holiday-maker-program/

Our Association notes and supports Action Item 3.4 (extract below) in the Thrive 2030 strategy, action and implementation plan:

In addition to this, we draw your attention to the following initiatives that would enhance the Working Holiday Maker program:

Removing some of the additional WHM visa subclass 462 requirements

Work and Holiday (sub-class 462) visa applicants must meet additional requirements to those on the 417 subclass (Working Holiday) visa, varying between eligible countries and based on the agreements set out in the MOU for partner countries. These can include requiring tertiary level education, English language testing and letters of support from foreign governments. These requirements are not evenly applied to all countries in the program (and are not requirements under the subclass 417 visa). For example, applicants from Spain need to undergo English Language testing, which is not applicable for applicants from their neighbouring country, France. These additional requirements act as a barrier to applying and generate negative word of mouth for the scheme, so we request that they are reviewed and where possible removed to level the playing field between countries.

Our Association would be pleased to have a representative elaborate on the issues, should you wish to contact us click here.

Yours sincerely,

WENDI AYLWARD, CHAIRPERSON 

 

THRIVE 2030 strategy is a long-term plan for growing Australia’s visitor economy. Click here to read more.

LATEST POSTS

9 June 2024

To: Austrade

 

To whom it may concern:

Ref: Thrive 2030 Strategy – Youth Tourism

We write to you on behalf of the Backpacker and Youth Tourism Advisory Panel (BYTAP) in relation to the Thrive 2030 strategy.

BYTAP is the peak industry body for the vital youth tourism sector of the visitor economy, and is supported by, and has representation on the Panel, from the three formal, incorporated state-based youth tourism associations in Australia, being Adventure Queensland (AQ), Youth Tourism Victoria (YTV), and Youth Tourism NSW (YTNSW). We also consult regularly with youth tourism operators across Australia in other States. Additionally, we are regularly in contact with ATEC and TTF.

Our Association particularly advocates for the Working Holiday Maker program, that is worth $3.2Bn annually to the Australian economy (source: Tourism Australia, Working Holiday Maker Snapshot, 2021 –

www.tourism.australia.com/content/dam/digital/corporate/documents/ta-whm-infographic-october-2021.pdf)

BYTAP supports continuation and expansion of this critical reciprocal cultural exchange program, under the current policy settings, that currently encompasses 48 countries.

In particular, we draw your attention to the most recent report on the program to December 2023:

https://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/research-and-statistics/statistics/visa-statistics/visit

Additionally, a Austrade/Flinders University report on Perceptions of the Working Holiday Maker program (published 2022) contains essential information on this essential market segment – see https://bytap.org/perceptions-of-australias-working-holiday-maker-program/

Our Association notes and supports Action Item 3.4 (extract below) in the Thrive 2030 strategy, action and implementation plan:

In addition to this, we draw your attention to the following initiatives that would enhance the Working Holiday Maker program:

Removing some of the additional WHM visa subclass 462 requirements

Work and Holiday (sub-class 462) visa applicants must meet additional requirements to those on the 417 subclass (Working Holiday) visa, varying between eligible countries and based on the agreements set out in the MOU for partner countries. These can include requiring tertiary level education, English language testing and letters of support from foreign governments. These requirements are not evenly applied to all countries in the program (and are not requirements under the subclass 417 visa). For example, applicants from Spain need to undergo English Language testing, which is not applicable for applicants from their neighbouring country, France. These additional requirements act as a barrier to applying and generate negative word of mouth for the scheme, so we request that they are reviewed and where possible removed to level the playing field between countries.

Our Association would be pleased to have a representative elaborate on the issues, should you wish to contact us click here.

Yours sincerely,

WENDI AYLWARD, CHAIRPERSON 

 

THRIVE 2030 strategy is a long-term plan for growing Australia’s visitor economy. Click here to read more.

LATEST POSTS